The one that almost got away

I am getting ready to trade some of our vinylly found classic rock vinyl for some soul funk and jazz vinyl this weekend.  A balance of power if you will.  So I went digging through the boxes we have that I haven’t looked through since our kick off shindig in March.  As I was flipping through the boxes for classic rock I came across an early 70’s Joe Tex record.  What in the world was this monster doing in here.  I can’t believe we had this for sale, in the $3 bin no less.  I must say, nothing beats digging through your own records and finding some gems you didn’t even realize were in there because from the time you purchased the record, to the time you found it again, your perspective on the music has changed. This, to me anyways, is evidence that we are inhabiters of our own perception of time and space.  We were so focused on curating some vinyl to showcase and sell that this record was completely passed on and boxed up.

I digress, I remember I made a pretty good find of about 25 records a couple days before the vintage market back in March.  I posted about the epic Meters first pressing that I found which is just a classic album I couldn’t believe that I had found for a wallet busting $2.  The excursion also produced this Joe Tex record.  It has a few minor scratches and the cover is a bit tattered which is most likely why we put this in the $3 bin but it plays great.  I am thankful that no one had the Joe Tex fever that day, because they would probably be rocking this joint as we speak and writing their own blog about how they found this record for $3 at a vintage market.  I hope this is a bug that I can pass along and that everyone gets infected.

Joe Tex played on the King label back in the early 60s with James Brown, and wrote some songs for Brown.  This particular album came out at the same time that Tex converted to Islam so it oozes with angst.  There are a couple really funky tracks mixed with some soul ballads.  It is an all around solid album.  I have included the title track which was one of Tex’s biggest hits of his career.

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